Trump is looking past today’s Electoral College vote to Jan. 6

Electors from the key states that Joe Biden flipped in November cast their ballots for president Monday in the formal Electoral College process that will affirm Biden’s election as the 46th president of the United States.

The battleground states of Nevada, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Michigan and Wisconsin all sealed election victories for Biden on Monday as electors for all 50 states and the District of Columbia met in each state.

California’s votes around 5 p.m. ET is expected to put Biden over the 270 total needed to win the White House.

Vermont’s three electors were the first to cast their votes for Biden just after 10 a.m. ET, with Tennessee following shortly after with 11 votes for President Donald Trump. Three key states that Trump won — North Carolina, Ohio and Florida — cast their ballots for the President.

Trump has continued to spread false claims of widespread fraud despite courts in all of the battleground states rejecting his campaign’s challenges to the election.

The Supreme Court dealt the final blow against his efforts to overturn the election result late Friday, dismissing a case brought by the Texas attorney general that sought to disenfranchise millions of voters in four states.

Wisconsin’s Supreme Court denied yet another challenge from Trump’s campaign on Monday, just before the state’s electors were scheduled to meet and cast their votes for Biden.

Today’s process is a constitutionally-mandated ritual that’s typical no more than a curious afterthought following a presidential election, but the Electoral College vote has taken on newfound significance this year as Trump and his GOP allies make unprecedented efforts to subvert the popular will of the voters and overturn Biden’s November victory.

CNN’s John King breaks it down: